Animals

5 most common canine diseases transmitted by ticks

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Ticks, small parasites that adhere to the skin of animals to feed on the substances that house the blood, can transmit many diseases. Here we bring you the five most common ones that can affect your partner.

8/21/2018 | JyS writing

1. Lyme disease or Borreliosis

Transmitted by the bite of a deer tick (Ixodes ricinus), which is only found in the north of the peninsula since it requires a lot of humidity and an average temperature of 12 ºC, the symptoms of this disease range from joint pain, lethargy, decreased appetite to fever, although the most characteristic It is intermittent lameness that usually changes from one limb to another, the carpus being the most affected joint. The signs of infection may take months to appear. It should be noted that in dogs there is no skin rash in the area of ​​the bite, as if it occurs in humans.

2. Anaplasmosis

It is transmitted by ticks of the genus Ixodes Y Dermacentor. This disease affects especially the spleen, liver, kidneys, lymphatic system, joints and nervous system. Symptoms range from apathy and lack of appetite in milder cases to fever, enlarged lymph nodes, muscle and respiratory problems. Anaplasma It infects the dog's platelets, so it will cause symptoms related to the lack of blood clotting, appearing, blood in feces, urine and nose.

3. Ehrlichiosis

It is one of the most common diseases after a tick bite. It is transmitted by the dog's brown tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus, distributed throughout most of Spain and caused by the bacteria Ehrlichia canis. The symptoms are fever, lack of appetite, weight loss, depression, watery eyes, respiratory problems, alterations of the lymphatic system that cause increased nodes or nosebleeds. These symptoms may take time to appear.

4. Babesiosis

Babesiosis is produced by Babesia canis which is transmitted in Europe by brown canine tick, Dermacentor reticulatus and Ixodes canisuga, the two known as dog ticks. This disease appears mainly in the warm spring and summer months.

Babesiosis can occur acutely or chronically:

- Acute form: After ten to twenty days after the bacteria have entered, the dog has a fever (up to 41 degrees), lack of appetite, diarrhea, vomiting, respiratory problems and apathy.

- Chronic form: intermittent fever, marked weight loss, liver disorders (jaundice), enlarged spleen, anemia and even death from shock.

The prognosis of babesiosis is severe. The dog must be treated in time because, if not, it can die due to liver and kidney failure. This disease especially attacks puppies and sick or convalescent animals.

5. Hepatozoonosis

It is a disease caused by protozoa, the Hepatozoon canis in the case of Europe, and it is transmitted by the tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus. The most frequent cases occur in spring and summer. It is usually associated with poor hygienic conditions and in specimens with nutritional deficiencies of impaired immune system.

The transmission of the disease occurs after ingestion of ticks parasitized by the dog, not by bites. The ingested tick reaches the dog's digestive system, the agents responsible for hepatozoonosis cross the dog's intestine and go to the liver, ganglia and bones.

Animals may have no symptoms or have fever, lethargy, anemia, weight loss, muscle aches and paralysis. There may also be digestive and respiratory symptoms.

shutterstock.com / Dmitry Kalinovsky

The treatment of these diseases is based on administering antibiotics for a period of three to four weeks. For babesiosis and hepatozoonosis, the injectable imidocarb for veterinary use is used. The prognosis of cure of the disease depends on the virulence of the microorganism and the strength of the dog's immune system and its ability to defeat the disease. Preventing the transmission of diseases transmitted by ticks is relatively easy if prevention collars, liquid antiparasitic treatments or tablets are used that can be acquired and recommended by any veterinarian.

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